Sunday, September 10, 2017

Swim for your life

I found this quote below really funny. 

A childhood friend from Malaysia, Andre, jokes that "maybe we're genetically not suited to the water". He says that an Aussie swim coach who used to chuck learners into the deep end back in Australia told him he was shocked to find in Malaysia that "Asian kids just sank to the bottom like rocks".

What it does tell us is that it is so important that your children learn to swim, as at some point in Australia they will be at a beach, swimming pool or river. I think most people in Australia who drown are visitors to our shores, and I am not sure what can be done about that. The Aussies who drown are probably very drunk.

Learning to swim was part of my school education and R's back in the UK where his school had a swimming pool. Apparently at schools now parents have to pay dearly for their children to learn to swim and it is no longer the price of of sixpence for pool admission, as it was when I was carted in volunteer parental cars to the local pool to learn to swim. 

If you are are connected with young person, be it as and uncle or aunt or a grandparent or even a parent, make sure they can swim enough to save their lives.



21 comments:

  1. My late brother and I learned to swim at very early ages, which was a good thing because we were living close to the ocean at Slade Point via Mackay when I was a toddler, up until I was just over 3 years old. We were in the water all the time. And throughout our childhood years swimming played a major part of our time.

    Have a good week, Andrew. :)

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    1. Lee, I think that is the experience for most Aussie kids back then, myself and my siblings included. Thanks.

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  2. That extra cost for school lessons is for the bus, the pool instructors fees and insurance - from an acquaintance fed up with the rising cost of those lessons but living too far from the pool for regular out of school hours visits.
    You make a good point about adults learning to swim - many of my 'older' friends can't- just laugh it off saying they don't go to the pool. They just shrug their shoulders when I mention the beach or even rivers ~ Cathy

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    1. Cathy, you have given me clarity of thought. There was no bus, no pool instructor and no insurance, just the cheap pool admittance fee. I guess for older people it is not so important, but I am surprised to learn that they did not learn when they were young.

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  3. For the long summer holidays, I spent every day on the beach where my father taught my brothers and I to swim. Very early in life.

    We won't die from drowning, but we might die from skin cancer.

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    1. Hels, skin cancers are very topical for me, but weren't childhood summers spent at the beach just lovely.

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  4. I learned to swim very early. My parents taught me - out of necessity. Apparently before I could walk I just crawled into the nearest body of water without any regard for depth or current. Unlike the Asians I am a floater. If I jump into water upright it doesn't come over my chin (my partner sinks to the eyes).

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    1. Ah EC, you made me laugh. So you won't die from drowning, being as buoyant as your are.

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  5. So much of our Summers are concentrated around the pool, that it's inconceivable that younger family members would be unable to swim. We start them as babies.

    I, however, was one of those who was thrown in!

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    1. Cro, and the harsh swimming lesson worked as you have never drowned.

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  6. Learning to swim young is necessary for survival around here too and like Australia, seems like most who drown are drunk or hit their heads diving into unknown waters, on dares, often also drunk.

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    1. Strayer, much the same here, but there is a big problem with tourists and recent arrivals, mostly Indian, drowning.

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  7. Elephant's Child, I'll get in before himself does. It's our build, the two of us joined together could have saved half the Titanic. One swimming test was to dive to the bottom and pick up a handful of sand and I could never make it that far not to mention never being able to keep my eyes open in salt water, so I lied and said I dropped it.

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    1. Jah Teh, I have no photo of EC and I assumed she was slim and velt. Mordialloc Beach was it? Once I matured, I learnt how to go down.......in water.

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  8. We all know how to swim, except my sister with the water phobia and mum, who is dead now so that doesn't matter anymore. I'm not sure if my younger grand daughter can swim, I'll ask next time I see them whenever that may be, and I'll ask too, if my brother's grandson, who turned four yesterday is having swimming lessons.

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    1. River, yes, do ask about the young ones. It is quite important. I don't think your sister is at much risk of drowning, given where she lives.

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  9. Absolutely Andrew, even more so if you have a pool in the back garden.. but yes children in Australia learn to swim almost before they learn to walk ☺

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    1. Grace, Little Jo certainly did.

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  10. We did swimming as a school sport and we learnt to swim as part of it,
    well at least float some people are not too good in water.
    Merle..........

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    1. Merle, I am not a great swimmer in spite of we too have school swimming sports but I can at least swim.

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