Friday, March 28, 2014

Lovely train

Isn't this a lovely looking steam train. It must have one of the last designs. It is of the same design as the more famous Mallard engine, used on the English north eastern railway. Yes, the line we will travel on in May.

Obviously it is not in regular service now but runs special services on the Great Western Railway from Bristol Temple Meads through the Somerset countryside and the along the Devon coast to almost Dartmouth (a ferry ticket across the river to Dartmouth is included in the price).



I wish there was a bit more seriousness for preserving our railway heritage in Australia. I hope to visit the Transport for London museum when we visit, but we won't have time to see the brilliant National Rail Museum in York. We have seen the excellent rail museum in Tokyo where visitor numbers far exceeded expectations after its opening. Our National Rail Museum in Port Adelaide is not bad, but it is a case that money needs to invested into the museum to attract paying crowds.

In England, we may be able to visit the Beamish Transport Museum and or the (George) Stephenson Transport Museum in North Shields.

Anyway, it is lovely to see the Torbay Express going through its paces.


25 comments:

  1. Andrew, I hope so you will put some photos from you journey. This train looks very modern and I hope you will have a great time in it. There are some trains museums the most important is near Poznan

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    1. Yes Gosia, there will be lots of photos. I am pleased that you have some train museums.

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  2. Sounds like someone is getting very excited about their forthcoming trip.

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    1. Fun60, the trip yes, the flights, no!

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  3. Hello Andrew
    I share your love of steam trains (and all trains in my case) mine stems from the fact my paternal grandfather was a fireman on the Great Northern Railway in Northern Ireland.
    Did you know there's a company called Steamrail Victoria that has day tours from Spencer Street (oops sorry Southern Cross).
    Take care
    Cathy

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    1. Cathie, sadly Steamrail trips have never been at a convenient time for me, but I have been excited to hear the whistle and see the smoke as a train travels through South Yarra and Hawksburn.

      One day I will take at look at the GNR in NI.

      Ann O'dyne coined the phrase So Cross Station, which I like to use.

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  4. Great looking train, did I see right do the windows really open.
    Merle...............

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    1. They do open Merle, to let in the smoke and soot, haha.

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  5. Not sure 1937 is exactly 'modern' but like London's 'Feltham' tramcar of 1931 the design has stood the test of time and still looks up-to-date. Yes, the windows open although I believe the size of the opening has been modified so you can't actually put your head through the gap. I've probably missed it but are you going just to the UK or elsewhere?

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    1. Chris, I should think our VR art deco looking train might have been a newer design. I've never really checked when the last steam train was designed.

      River cruise Budapest to Amsterdam, train to Brussels, Eurostar to London and a few days later train to Newcastle. We won't have time to look around Amsterdam (been before) or Brussels.

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  6. Ignore previous re window openings :-(

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  7. "I wish there was a bit more seriousness for preserving our railway heritage in Australia."
    Not to mention a lot of other heritage items.
    It is a nice looking train, lovely colour too.

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    1. River, the worst is buildings of substance that could be put to another use just demolished, to replaced by a building no one will ever love.

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  8. I am a Luddite! Nonetheless I had the good luck to visit the Bristol Industrial Museum, on Prince's Wharf, that closed in 2006. On display was Bristol's industrial past, including shipping and railways.

    Fortunately the railway, cranes, harbour and vessels all now form part of the working exhibits at M Shed Museum which has been open since 2011 on the same site as the old museum. I haven't seen M Shed, but I love Bristol.

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    1. Hels, that all sounds great. Bristol is a bit off the tourist trail, but it was an important place and probably should have a higher profile.

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  9. Bill will be very envious of you and your trip on the train. Tell us all the details when you have been.

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    1. Diane, that would be Bill, from the land of the funicular and cog railways :)

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  10. I love trains. Looks like you have some beautiful ones in Australia. I want to visit Europe and take the trains to all of the countries! Someday...

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    1. Australia has some nice trains Keith, but nothing compared to Europe and the UK.

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  11. It was lovely to see Andrew.. You really do love trains don't you :) I also think that there's something quite romantic about a train ride, so much better than flying :)

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    1. Grace, they are a very civilised way to travel.

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  12. Your post makes me think of our holidays end June ! We will ride on such an old steam train and make a tour through Cornwall !

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    1. Gattina, that will be terrific. I will take a look at the train on the net.

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  13. Sounds like a great trip ahead of you. There are some fantastic heritage railways still operating in the UK and I still have some on my Bucket List. We've been to the London Transport Museum, you'll love it. Envy, envy!

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    1. Bill, I reckon I could spend two months there and not even come close to seeing what I would like to. But we have so little time.

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