Tuesday, March 04, 2014

Catching the train to Kew

I don't why, but there was once a train to Kew. That is right in the middle of Kew, not far Kew. Kew is perfectly well serviced by trams. Although I would bet if the train still ran, it would be well patronised now, nay packed.

I walked the route, from Hawthorn Station to where Kew Station was. Lordy, it was a hot day. I'm not doing another of these until the weather is cooler.

From my late grandfather's street directory, here is a map showing the train route. Just two stations off the main line, Barker and Kew. The line opened in 1887, which answers why it was needed, as trams were not much about then. Trains stopped running on the branch line in 1952.


Hawthorn Station where I began my walk at one of Melbourne's nicer stations.


Our older stations are a huge contrast to our newer stations, not that we have many new ones, as our system does not expand.


Somewhere at the far end of this photo, the Kew branch line left the mainline. It was only a single line but with a siding as the terminus.


And it went right through this tennis court and heat affected garden.


Really not much in the way of remaining train infrastructure to see. There are some rather grand houses in Hawthorn.


This linear car park is where the linear (snort) train line ran.


It went right past Glenferrie Oval, home of the Hawthorn Football Club, except in our commercial maximising the buck times, it is now called Ausdoc Oval. Extraordinary! It won't catch on.


A linear park, where the train following its linear railway line travelled.



But once reaching Hawthorn Grove, this pretty ordinary place blocked the train linear parkland.


Quite hidden, but this is a very nice place next to the building above.


There you go. On the site of a redevelopment of the Barker Station site is lots of crushed bluestone, always a good clue to a train.


It was a closed construction site, so I had to walk along Hawthorn Grove. There were some nice houses.







Behind the fence, ran the train to Kew. I was walking in the rising heat along the hideous Princess Street, which was so overwhelmed with car traffic.


In a superb and delicious irony, Vic Roads, our state government organisation responsible for our major roads, has a huge mega complex of office towers sited exactly where Kew Railway Station was. I could not believe how big the site was. How many office people does Vic Roads have? I believe this driveway is pretty well the alignment of the railway line.


The trams in the area are pretty busy. I bet if the train line was still there, it would be very busy too.

13 comments:

  1. The article is very interesting because I can know more about Austrailan,s trains system. In my opinion well developed. But the houses are so nice and big ones.

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    1. Gosia, they are very nice houses and very expensive houses. Perhaps only 0.25% of the population can afford to live in such houses.

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  2. You do have some lovely old houses in Melbourne, I love wondering around the older areas checking out the old houses.
    Merle.............

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    1. So do I Merle, not just grand ones like this either.

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  3. There are sone fabulous homes down in your neck of the woods. Shame about the train line to Kew.

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    1. Bill, there are some very grand houses on the Mornington Peninsula where you holidayed, but most are hidden away behind shrubbery.

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  4. Love all the different houses. Take care walking in the heat but did make an interesting post.

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    1. Thanks Diane, although 32 today, I think most of the heat has gone.

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  5. Absolutely agreed... those Victorian houses were blissful, and seem to have been maintained very well. Ditto their lovely gardens.

    But you noted that the trains stopped running on the branch line in 1952. I normally blame Kennett for everything to do with the destruction of public infrastructure, but this is one thing we probably cannot blame him for.

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    1. Hels, Hawthorn is not an area I am so familiar with. It was interesting.

      What I would like to know rather than who stopped the trains, was who ordered the track ripped up and authorised the land sale.

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  6. I thought the Cain Jr then Kirner goats had started the ball rolling with closure of country rail stations, destruction infrastructure, sale then leaseback of trains, loss of State Bank etc.
    Sadly, I find myself often agreeing with common sentiments about lib vs labor at both state and federal levels, but wonder if we should sometimes accept that the differences are primarily relative or differences of degree rather than significant differences in policy or philosophy - i.e. If only Labor stood for what some of us once believed it stood for.

    Fancy changing the name of Glenferrie Oval. Was that decision made/approved by a former state premier with a depressing hairdo?

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    1. Oops! Freudian typo?
      Did not mean to write goVts as goats...

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    2. Yes FC, as much as I like to blame Kennett, many trains disappeared under Labor. The two parties really are a pig in a poke. No light on the hill anymore.

      Much as I detest the former premier, I doubt even he would stoop so low. I will ask knowledgeable people about it when I see them.

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