Sunday, February 09, 2014

A stroll to town

This will do for Sunday Selections. River usually posts and sometimes Jackie.

I walked into the city quite early because it was going to be a hot day, like 39 degrees. It is quite different taking photos in the morning, with the sun on the wrong side of they sky.

Down the bottom of this floral display is an unrecognisable word planted with flowers. The statue is of Marquess of Linlithgow. Later edit: Diabetes is the word. 


A memorial to those lost in the Boer War.


The very upmarket apartment block The Melburnian replaced Prince Henry's Hospital, known earlier as the Melbourne Homoeopathic Hospital. The hospital closed in 1991. Inner Melbourne still has two large public hospitals, The Royal Melbourne and The (Prince) Alfred.


Out of focus but it is a statue of Colonel Sir Ernest Edward "Weary" Dunlop, AC, CMG, OBE. He was apparently a very good man.  


Eureka, Melbourne's tallest building and Australia's tallest residential building.


The memorial to police killed while on duty. Their names are inscribed on the wall.


Uphold the Right. I wasn't aware it had changed form French to English. It used to be Tenez le Droit.


The Walker Fountain, built with funds donated by Ron Walker. The less said about him the better.


I've never seen  the hardy plant agapanthus burnt like this, no doubt during our heat wave of four successive days over 40 degrees.


I am not good with English royalty, so I am not sure if Edward VII was ever a king.


Usually people take photos of the floral clock from the bottom rather than the top. I can see why. The floral clock was a gift from watchmakers of Switzerland. Seems I have a sticky lens. Don't you just hate been sticky.


Work has been going on in this part of the Queen Victoria Gardens for more than a year. Since water is not flowing, it seems there is more to do.


There is that sun on the wrong side of the sky again.


What's that in the distance?


The water is very muddy, indicating something had disturbed it. There were plenty of workmen around.


A separate pond, with the water grey in this one.


There is some kind of floating weed under these nets. Men in waders were on the far side of the water.


The flowers lining the path towards the city are past their prime. The four days of heat made everything past their prime. Certainly me.


Yes, I thought so, a piano.


Two older women sitting in contemplation. One arrived on a wheelchair.


The Pathfinder, a sculpture of an Olympic hammer thrower. People steal the hammer so it is only in place for about six hours.


The entrance to the Victorian National Gallery of Australia. In front of the glass water wall is advertising for the Melbourne Now exhibition. The evil former State Premier Kennett wanted to get rid of the glass wall with water running down it, but the public revolted and forced a redraw of renovation plans.


20 comments:

  1. I enjoyed your tour, pretty place.
    Merle............

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  2. Mr Dunlop looks abit stiff

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    1. John, he was a very formal man, so he should be stiff.

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  3. What a nice walk -- even if the sun did not know its place.

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    1. Glad you liked it Rubye. I was a bit sweaty by the end of it.

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  4. I think you can take it that when a Royal has a numeral attached to their name s/he was a monarch.

    Edward VII was the son of Queen Victoria who became King when she died and who provided us (unwittingly?) with the Edwardian era.

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    1. Of course I know that Victor. It is obvious, well now.

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  5. Don't forget St V's.
    I love the really early morning light on a clear day for taking pics. If I ever get up that early!

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    1. Fen, I don't see it as the same. It is or was religion based, rather than a proper public hospital.

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    2. It was founded by Nuns and has its roots in religion, but is no longer religion focussed.

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  6. Andrew, great trip in the morning. What a shame it's very far from my country. The most impressive building is Eureka I would like to stay in for one day it would be fun because I live on the third floor.

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    1. Thanks Gosia. At the top is a glass box that extends out and then the floor goes clear. We took Chainsaw Niece up in the box a few years ago. I can't find the post now, but here is another post about it. http://highriser.blogspot.com.au/2007/05/first-in-queue.html

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    2. Thanks for the link

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  7. That agapanthus is looking a lot greener than ours. I like the look of The Melburnian, but wouldn't like to live in Eureka, especially up high when there are gale force winds blowing.

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    1. River, I recall reading about the stabilising features of Eureka. It has some very high tech stuff. There are two water tanks at the top. If the building sways one way, water is quickly pumped to the other side to keep it upright. Oh, I think I have made it sound even more scary.

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  8. You make me want to visit even more! Beautiful gardens. Beautiful statues and architecture... Even if the hammer is only temporary!

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    1. Mitchell, I suppose I do paint it in a good light. We are fortunate to have a lot of parkland. There is also the very gritty side to our city.

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  9. What a tres jolie walk Andrew, so glad you did it early, can't stand the heat :) surely it has to come to an end soon !

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    1. Yeah Grace, there are walks I want to do, but this time of the year, it is just too damn hot.

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